HMRC mark U-turn on VAT for IT Managed Services

HMRC appears to have done something positive for a change in a way that will be welcome news for IT Managed Service Providers.

Last year, HMRC advised that only large system IT integrators would get a VAT refund for aggregated purchases. Public sector organisations were thus being penalised for buying standardised ‘off the shelf’ Cloud services and having to pay the full amount of VAT on purchases.  An unjust penalty where transparency and best price are being argued for by the regulators.

However, following representations to HMRC from public sector bodies which spend several billion pounds per year, happily HMRC have done a pleasing U-turn on VAT refunds. The new document published this week, ‘Contracting Out Services’ guidance, shows that cloud services are now eligible for the VAT reclaim. Hardware can be considered but only if part of a managed service bundle. The new rules also support a “disaggregated” managed IT service, where the various areas of IT such as hosting and networks are broken up into multiple suppliers.

The rules specifically state that the following services should be included in the VAT refund:

• Hosting Computing Services
• Archiving Communication Services
• Data Communications Services
• Desktop Communications Services, for example Picture Archiving Services (PACS)
• Ethernet cable/Data lines and Cloud computing

With the new G-Cloud 7 Digital Marketplace providers to be announced in November to compliment the public sector tendering frameworks, the Government’s linking of a transparent approved supplier system and joined up thinking on tax for public sector buyers will make a positive change for SMEs and their clients on tightened budgets, especially in the downtrodden NHS marketplace.  The latest sales reported for G-Cloud are £753million, with 51% in value and 60% in volume going to SMEs (defined as sub 250 employees with annual turnover not exceeding Euro 50 millions).  77% of total sales by value were through Central Government, with 23% through the Wider Public Sector.

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Beware of the local cloud

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A new wearable device is currently being crowdsourced called the ReVault. On the face of it, it looks like a fairly standard smartwatch – but its secret weapon is invisible – your own local cloud.

The Revault watch comes in both 32GB and 128GB variants and can connect to your phone, tablet or even PC as a wireless hard drive.  The pitch is that you can have one copy of your data on your watch and can then access it across all your devices without the need of syncing each to a PC or a cloud in advance. You can even access this data when you have no internet connection as it connects locally via either Bluetooth or WiFi so this local cloud will work in places where you can’t connect to your regular cloud services.

The idea of separating physical storage from your device is not a new one, although the idea has faded away in recent years due to Cloud storage offerings and manufacturers being able to charge more for high capacity flash storage models. Having a memory card in your phone is seen by some as an advantage as you could get additional storage (including capacity far outreaching the device manufacturers options for a lot less), plus the flexibility to move your content to your next device, again without the additional cost on a pricier high capacity model.

Portable wireless storage could be the replacement for memory cards as it has distinct advantages and doesn’t require the device manufacturers to physically include compatibility – which is something they have little incentive to do.

A real concern is when these devices, personally owned by employees, are taking into the work space. Many companies will block the use of USB storage and block public cloud networks, however as the Revault is neither reliant on a physical or internet connection these devices is unlikely to be blocked by a standard company security policy.

The Revault will probably be a niche product and the chances of copycat devices or functionality remains uncertain at this point.  However, the strength of this crowdsourcing campaign could play a vital role in its success if personal clouds become relevant to a larger market.  One thing is certain though, new devices will always test your security practices and you will need to be vigilant to safeguard your corporate data from the ever evolving and unmonitored consumer device and services market.

 

This week’s technology news – 23rd January 2015

Are you into Cloud yet?

Offering peer insight, a recent 2015 survey of over 200 IT and security professionals by US expert ‘not for profit’ organisation The Cloud Security Alliance (CSA), found that 72% of companies questioned, didn’t know the number of shadow IT apps within their own organisation.

This has been blamed on a lack of knowledge about Cloud by both IT staff and senior execs in organisations.  CSA’s CEO Jim Reavis explains:  “The word “Cloud” means different things to different people in a company.  In IT departments, “Cloud” often refers to a specific type of server virtualization technology, or use of IaaS platforms such as Amazon AWS.  For everyone else, SaaS is also “Cloud,” including used tools such as Dropbox, Google Docs, LinkedIn and Facebook”.

Another problem is procurement.  Employees can readily sign up for cloud services without any input from IT at all.  The answer for this would be to monitor outbound connections, block access to certain sites and manage the increasing proliferation of BYOD devices.  Staff bypassing the IT department can quickly create potential headaches and security issues for organisations in ignoring governance and compliance.

Security of data remains the top barrier to cloud adoption, however organisations are still moving forward in adopting cloud services with 74% confirming wholesale adoption, or at least step migration into Cloud services. Part of the holdback remains a lack of knowledge and experience by IT and business managers.  49% of companies with fewer than 5,000 employees reported spending more than 20% of their IT budget on Cloud services.

One of the ‘progressive’ spin offs for companies witnessing the data disasters experienced by major retailers, banks and blue chip names in 2013 and 2014, is the increased involvement of executives taking the decision making around IT to the boardroom which has risen to 61%.  This according to Reavis is a good thing: “We think it will help close the gap on some of the problems we were talking about.”

CSA hopes to enable organisations to make better decisions and help confidently and responsibly accelerate the use of Cloud services in their environments.  The whole report can be accessed at:
https://cloudsecurityalliance.org/research/surveys

Organisations seeking to take their first step into Cloud Services and wondering about security, compliance, scalability and flexibility or cost savings can review the Cloud framework videos offered by Amicus ITS at http://www.cloudservicesframework.com or our dedicated Backup +Recovery options at http://backupandrecovery.amicusits.co.uk

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Windows 10 – The price for success is….Free!

This week Microsoft held a Windows 10 event, containing several big announcements that showed off a new Microsoft with fighting spirit. Press events are not usually Microsoft’s strong suit, but this latest event showcased a new mastery of showmanship reminiscent of Apple’s best product announcements.

The show started off with a bang; Windows 10 will be free to anyone running on Windows 7 or above if they upgrade within the first year of the Windows 10 release. This move alone will likely give Windows 10 the best launch yet.  Free upgrades of course will slash potential short-term profits on desktop licences but Microsoft is thinking bigger – and is a cunning strategy to grow Windows beyond the PC.

With Windows 8, Microsoft promised the same experience across all your devices, be they PCs, tablets or phones. This move did not play out as well as hoped. The idea was good but the execution left many feeling alienated, expressing they had been forced a mobile, touch-driven interface on their non-touch PC.

This time around the same strategy is in place but much of work has been done to tailor the interface to each particular device type, whether it is big, small, touch, keyboard and mouse, or even a mix.

If you are on a desktop you will see a new version of the much missed Start bar and on a tablet, the full Start screen Windows 8 introduced. These modes can also aquatically switch on hybrid PCs, for example detaching the keyboard on a Surface tablet will switch it from PC to tablet mode on the fly.

This is all well and good on an OS layer but it is apps that are hugely important today. During the event Microsoft demonstrated new universal apps like Office will run on Windows 10 from small phones to large PCs and these apps like the OS will also adapt to each.  This apps pitch alongside the free upgrade is Microsoft’s big play.

If Windows 10 gets the expected momentum, with users actively downloading new apps from the Windows store, app developers would be silly to ignore this huge new market. With these same new apps made for desktop, but also able to run on Windows Phones, this could give Microsoft’s mobile platform the shot in the arm it certainly needs.

What Microsoft is essentially doing is incorporating Windows Phone as a platform into just “Windows”, reflected in its new renaming; dropping the “phone” to simply “Windows 10” so it can reap the benefits from its desktop monopoly.

In addition, as part of Microsoft’s ‘Continuity’, they announced its voice assistant ‘Cortana’ will, for the first time, be branching out from just the phone to tablets and PCs also. This was demo’d by asking the PC with voice to find specific documents, search for photos from a specific month, dictate emails, control music and more.

As if this wasn’t enough, the much rumoured new browser was officially launched. Currently called ‘Project Spartan’, this browser will come alongside Internet Explorer which will be kept to handle legacy and corporate intranet sites. Project Spartan uses a new rendering engine alongside a different, newer look and feel. A new annotations feature lets you doodle on pages and share with others. Plus Cortana support is also built-in, letting you search with your voice and intelligently suggest searches as you start typing, based on previous interactions (such as showing flight details booked when typing in the airlines site).

All in all, Windows 10 is shaping up to finally live up to Microsoft’s ambitious goals which misfired with Windows 8. The free upgrade will ensure it gets the best launch possible, which will please consumers and developers alike, and give Windows Phone its best chance of success.

The sting in the tail is for hardware partners.  Obviously you cannot please everyone in this game – and with users getting free Windows 10 upgrades later in 2015, it is the hardware partners who will not be happy, as they will face that challenge of seeing their usual buyers staying away as for once they do not have to buy new PCs upon upgrade.

Microsoft’s Windows 10 event this week, wasn’t just about new software that was shown off.  There was also a big splash about the business implications for holograms and the persuasive use of collaboration technology with a new 84″ meeting display?   Interested – watch this space on Monday 26th January!

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The Week’s Technology News – 19th December 2014

IT security needs embracing in the boardroom
Talking from GCHQ headquarters this week, Minister for the Cabinet Office, Francis Maude has urged businesses to make IT security a boardroom issue.  Amicus ITS has recommended this point repeatedly in blogs this year.  Government is now urging businesses to review IT security as an integral part of strategic thinking for the Board, to ensure secure data management remains at the heart of the agenda.

With recent breaches affecting major household names both in the UK and the US, Maude warns against complacency:  “All companies, large or small, face threats from vulnerabilities on a daily basis”.

The Government’s launch of Cert UK earlier this year, created a cyber security information sharing partnership, now enabling 750 organisations to exchange information in real time on threats and vulnerabilities occurring.   Maude pointed to GCHQ data which showed that 80% of attacks were preventable, if best practice was followed.

As organisations are reflecting on 2014 with their staff at Christmas parties up and down the land, a cautionary ice cube should be travelling down the spine of any Board members whose businesses have not thought to place IT security at the forefront of their business continuity plans.  For them, January will be the time to really start pulling this into focus on the 2015 Agendas to review, consult, embrace and invest as required, to ensure the bottom line of their business is not threatened – either profitability or reputation.

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Nats on the rack for IT system failures
Thousands of travellers in UK airports were delayed last weekend due to a software problem from a faulty line of coding at the London Air Traffic Control Centre at Swanwick in Hampshire. National Air Traffic Services (Nats), which controls 200,000 m2 of airspace, reportedly had a power system failure on an internal telephone switch controlling nighttime ‘standby’ to daytime ‘live’ operation.

The partially privatised company (owned 49% by the UK Government, 41.9% by The Airline Group, 4% by Heathrow (formerly BAA)) and 5% by Nats’ employees), has been running air traffic control for commercial UK flights since 2002.

The company handled over 2.1million flights last year, carrying 220 million passengers in the UK.  Nats had problems with its IT in 2008. Additionally, the CAA criticised Nats in a report about a telephone failure which grounded 300 flights in 2013 – and flights in Southern England were delayed earlier in 2014 due to “technical problems”.

The problem software came from a package originally being developed by the US air traffic control network. When this project collapsed, it was left to Nats to work through the outstanding development to make it serviceable and raised the price of Swanwick’s delivery by £150m from an original £475m budget.  Some of the blame is said to lie with an aged IT infrastructure.  Nats CEO explains, “There are 50 different systems at Swanwick and around four million lines of code”.  Nats’  decision last year to make a significant number of its most experienced, older IT engineers redundant when these were the specialists most used to working with the older technology, will not have helped. Especially worrying with this failure is that the fault had not been seen before.  The latest incident follows accusations about a corporate failure to invest in new technology and opens Nats to an increased risk of repeated outtages in future – this despite CEO Richard Deakin’s promise that £575m was being invested over the next five years.

A CAA inquiry will now be launched to assess whether Nats has learned from its previous failures, with the risk of its licence being reviewed. It will be a bumpy ride for the UK’s Transport Secretary, Patrick McLoughlin who will be providing a full account to Parliament about what went wrong.   Clearly any organisation, whatever type, lumbered with legacy infrastructure whether hardware, software or both will see operational effectiveness and bottom line profitability suffer if the Board does not grip the bull by the horns and review and assess the best way to upgrade and secure their IT systems.

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Microsoft and Skype attempt to eliminate the language barrier 
Back in May, during the Code Conference event, Microsoft demoed a breakthrough, upcoming feature for Skype which would let people who speak different languages talk to each other without a human translator. Users can either voice or video call each other with translations appearing in near real-time with options for spoken and sub-title like written translations.

This week Skype has opened up a preview of this new feature to Skype users who would like to give the in-development service a spin. Interested parties can go to the Skype website and register their interest. Currently the preview is limited to just English and Spanish languages with more promised coming soon. Initial reactions report – although not perfect yet – the service does exactly as you would expect, allowing two people who can’t speak the same language hold a conversation.

The business applications for an accurate auto-translator that can handle both voice and video calls are enormous. For example a single-language Service Desk could be enabled to communicate with customers worldwide without the traditional language barrier or costly multilingual employees. Skype Translator if successful will shake up the translating business even more, with the need for a dedicated human translator being brought up into question and the knowledge of knowing additional languages not being as valued as is currently.

As the technology develops and matures it is also likely we will see Skype Translator being incorporated into Microsoft’s enterprise communication tool Lync, which was recently announced to be later rebrand Skype for business, and if so, adds further reasoning for the name change decision.

The future for Skype is looking very promising and this announcement more than any so far, including the cross-compatibility of Lync and Skype makes Microsoft’s Skype acquisition in 2011 more justified than any announcement the two companies have made since. With Skype being pre-installed into Windows and tight integration with its own Microsoft account system Skype now more than ever fits very nicely into the Microsoft ecosystem.

With Microsoft’s current Mobile first, Cloud First mantra we will likely see Skype translator eventually being integrated into the Skype app for smart phones and tablets and with near real-time translations built into your phone, Microsoft may be the first to successfully smash the language barrier for all.

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Financial services benefiting from outside help
The financial sector has seen major changes since the start of the credit crunch in 2008.  Changes have occurred in working practice, organisational restructures, cost cutting exercises with branch closures in banking and jobs cuts with people replaced by technology as part of a digital strategy, which has seen sector employment decline by 16% since 2009.  Lloyds bank is cutting 9,000 staff as part of its digital strategy and Dutch bank ING has a similar project that will result in 1,700 staff losing their jobs.

Financial services organisations have increasingly turned towards using more third-party IT products, services and talent, as well as outsourcing their IT, which has boosted the number of workers in the IT sector.  According to an analysis by accountancy practice experts Nixon Williams, in 2009 there were 403,000 jobs in the IT sector compared to 459,000 in 2014 (12% up). In comparison, financial services jobs have fallen from 1.18m in 2009 to 986,000 today (16% down).

With the sector witnessing a major increase in automation software replacing manual roles and the rise in public expectation for truly 24×365 customer services, this places enormous pressure on financial institutions to manage such huge data volumes in highly regulated, highly secure environments and needing to resist any downtime or DDos.

Whilst traditionally the banking sector will have had huge in-house IT teams, the costs, regulations and pace of technology evolution has whetted the industry’s appetite for using third parties with expert knowledge and robust solutions.  This lies alongside the disconcerting reality of often uncomfortably large legacy IT systems that continue to create vulnerabilities whilst they remain unchanged and instead rely on being patched up, versus long term strategy and commitment to invest in new IT infrastructures with more flexible integrated systems.

Some of the larger banks are starting to think laterally by turning to third parties for IT innovation to develop and implement non-core systems and apps, involving joint ventures with other institutions or even working with start up firms.  These include Sumeet Chabria, CIO of HSBC Global Banking and Markets and Deutsche Bank who have recently set up a JV innovation project with IBM, Microsoft and Indian IT services firm HCL Technologies to improve its digital credentials.

The motivation to sharpen the pencil, starts to look clearer when recent studies such as those   from specialist retailer Bizrate Insight reveal that 72% of the public still trust banks with their details, over that of retailers.   However there is no room for complacency over ‘trust’.  Potential competition for marketshare should they move into banking could be on the horizon from established transactors Paypal and Amazon who jockey for position on the trust rankings at 48.9% and 45.4% respectively.   Tech giants Apple and Google lag further behind at 21.4% and 12.9% respectively.  Nonetheless all of these, as well as Facebook, all have systems that contain details about people and businesses and handle monetary transactions.   So the circling pirranhas angling for additional income streams and greater global dominance may include some new names in the future.

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Public Sector changing outsourcing habits in 2014
Market watcher ISG’s north Europe President, John Keppel, reports that the UK has seen a major boost in outsourcing from the public sector in 2014. This has included small and large contracts remaining in this country, versus being awarded offshore with spending levels nearly doubling in comparison to the UK’s private sector.

This has involved some big-ticket outsourcing deals but also a lot of mid-market government business.  Annual Contract Values (ACVs) from IT outsourcing in 2014 has risen 16% across EMEA, with France’s ACV increasing by 250%, whilst the UK with its more mature outsourcing market has seen a steady increase in line with cautious post recessionary optimism.  This is seen as largely due to the complexity of services required in the UK public sector, as well as a lack of appetite just to exploit cheaper resources from offshore suppliers.  The old adage buy cheap, pay twice perhaps resonating more closely with those responsible for procurement. “The challenge for buyers will be to understand how they can get the most value from their outsourcing efforts, and to understand the real business impact,” concludes Keppel.

Director of Sales at Amicus ITS, Les Keen comments:  “With the increase in Cloud services, this presents ever greater opportunities in 2015 for IT MSPs.  Those who can demonstrate the breadth of their experience, deliver the highest levels of data security, be a true 24×365 IT provider AND respect their customer as a business partner not a number – should see the benefit of working in this sector in 2015”.

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End of 2014
This is our last review of IT for the year and the blog staffers at Amicus ITS would like to take this opportunity to wish all our customers and everyone reading these posts, a very Happy Christmas and a peaceful New Year.   We will be back looking at the latest technology developments and worldwide IT business news once again in January.  See you in 2015.

The Week’s Technology News – 5th December 2014

Outsourcing priorities changing
The latest Forrester Research report across 435 Europe-based IT decision makers has found that whilst 60% of European businesses are satisfied with IT infrastructure service providers, there is a subtle shift in focus from simple cost reduction desire (66%) to businesses offering  services to help increase sales and improve customer experience (71%).

The overall feedback stats should give serious food for thought to MSPs when marketing and servicing their offerings:
• 34% said cost savings were lower than expected
• 29% said service quality or delivery was inconsistent or poor
• 26% said there is a lack of innovation and/or continuous service-level improvements
• 23% said there is a lack of flexibility in changing volume, scope, business needs or pricing models
• 22% said service providers lacked a fully developed and functioning global delivery model.

“Faced with this customer demand for better, faster and more cost-effective infrastructure services, and increased competition from emerging and India-centric suppliers, Europe’s leading providers are forced to bring new offerings and delivery models to the market,” said Forrester analyst Wolfgang Benkel. “The good news is some of them are finally listening to their customers.”

Businesses which have moved to cloud services are benefiting from accessing more flexible services and MSPs need to ensure that to deliver the most for their clients they have a) the right technical skill set b) the business skills to think strategically around the business objectives of their clients and c) the experience, diligence and ability to adapt to create a more innovative approach with their offerings, in order to stand out from the crowd.

The Euro responses indicate that just meeting an SLA is no longer what is needed in the MSP marketplace and that evidencing and thinking about all ones added values will be the key to retaining customers and winning new business in 2015.

Modular mobile phone developments and corporate tailored opportunities
Google was first out of the gate with a modular mobile phone announcement with Project Ara, planned for release in 2015, but not without competition. Finland based Circular Devices has announced its own plans to create and sell a modular smart phone called Puzzlephone next year.

The Puzzlephone approach is a simpler one with the smart phone being detachable into 3 parts; the spine (the main structure including the screen), the Heart (a large piece that slots into the bottom half of the back – this includes the battery and secondary electronics) and finally the Brain (This slots into the top half of the back – includes the processor and camera).   Google’s Project Ara approach is a lot more customisable with prototypes having 8 smaller, changeable parts – compared to Circular Devices larger 3.  However, it is possible that the simpler solution could win out with users finding Project Ara a bit too complex to get their head around.

With two companies now in preparations for a modular phone launch next year, making reality from the concept is s significant step closer. These devices should appeal to tech enthusiasts and organisations.  The potential for modular phones in the workplace is huge. Organisations would be able to create their tailored smartphone using selected prioritised modules according to their business need and deploy to employees. This would both have the benefit of cutting costs on unneeded or unused features but also being able to add in requested features such as larger capacity batteries or fingerprint scanners.   Another advantage of the modular approach is when things go wrong. Currently if a particular part of a phone fails, the whole unit has to be replaced or sent off to be repaired.  With a standard modular build, fixing future issues could be as simple as swapping the faulty part with stock.   Modular phones will be arriving next year, but their success will be dependent not only the cost of the phone and its modules, but how well the platform is supported by manufacturers providing unique hardware.  Over then to the android market and the likes of Samsung, HTC and Sony for part two of this evolving story…

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Sony hacked again – leaking unreleased films and 47,000 personal records
Sony is no stranger to data breaches, infamously having to pull down their Playstation network in 2011 for 3 weeks after 77 million customers were potentially compromised, later to be fined by the ICO.

Now Sony Picture Entertainment is the next division to fall under cyber-attack. The attack itself appears to be malware and has been used not only to steal data, but also wipe machines at Sony.  With hugely damaging commercial potential, four unreleased films have been leaked online pre-launch with personal details of 47,000 people including Hollywood stars such as Sylvestor Stallone exposed.

Since the Sony attack, the FBI has sent an alert out to US businesses warning them of malicious software that matches up with reports from the Sony Pictures attack. The report warns of malware that overrides all data on a computer’s hard drive including the master boor record, preventing booting up successfully afterwards.  The geographical origin of the attack remains unknown, but a group calling itself Guardians of Peace is claiming responsibility.     With both the risk of data leaks and data deletion, the importance of both a truly secure infrastructure and multiple data stores is more important than ever. For Sony this is another huge wake up call for a household name, swiftly becoming synonymous with susceptibility to cyber-attacks.

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Radio heads up some surgical changes for 5G
The race is on to deliver the fifth generation of our mobile network.  The build in excitement around 5G may in fact be wholly worthy of the buzz, if the latest news on this joined-up superfast technology pans out, as vaunted by Professor Rahim Tafazolli of Surrey University’s 5G Innovation Centre.  This means the opportunity for properly connected smart cities, remote medical surgery, driverless cars and the “internet of things”.  The thought of stalling videos and apps and load delays becoming a mere footnote in tech history would be thrilling news.  Prof Rahim Tafazolli says, “5G will be a dramatic overhaul and harmonisation of the radio spectrum”.

The difference comes from the 5G networks transmitting data via uninterrupted radio waves bouncing off small masts with improved antenna technology.  The waves split into bands (frequencies) with each band reserved for different communications ie.  one for TV broadcast, one for mobile data, one for aeronautical signals etc.  The system has got messy with new technologies squeezed into the gaps.  Now, the regulators, the International Telecommunications Union (ITG) are restructuring parts of the radio network used to transmit data to make more space whilst simultaneously creating efficiencies in the traffic flow, whilst 3G and 4G use carries on.  The network which scientists hope will kick in by 2020, will need to cope with vastly increased levels of communication. Through The Internet of Things (IoT), devices will ‘smarten’ and dynamically switch between three TBC ‘lanes’ (bandwidths) in order to avoid frequency overload and will rely on lower latencies (timelag between action initiation and response).  Ericsson predict that 5G’s latency will be around one millisecond – unperceivable to a human and about 50 times faster than 4G.

So what?  Well 5G is anticipated to run faster, much faster. In 2013 when Samsung announced it was testing 5G at 1Gbps, journalists reported that a high-definition movie could be downloaded in less than half a minute.  A speed of 800Gbps would equate to downloading 33 HD films – in a single second. This is 100 times faster.  To do this, it will need capacity – and lots of it.  By 2020 it is thought that 50 billion to 100 billion devices will be connected to the internet.

Whilst there is great competition between the giants Ericsson and Huawei, both are investing hugely in this research phase and despite the obvious rivalry and associated costs, each is co-operating with the other to bring on the technology to enable product development to advance.   Samsung hopes to launch a temporary trial 5G network in time for 2018’s Winter Olympic Games, whilst Huawei is racing to implement a version for the 2018 World Cup in Moscow. For Managed Service Providers and businesses alike the vast potential of 5G is a major game changer, but harnessing and directing opportunity to create an ‘intelligent’ and more intuitive commercial response for customers will be the real game changer for business.

Barclays seeks (again) to improve customer experience
Barclays is leading the way again in banking technology by seeking to deliver a more personal form of assistance to its customers.  Barclays Beacon service called ‘Barclays Access’ is being trialled in Sheffied and will work through an iPhone app.  iBeacon which uses Bluetooth to detect when a person using the app enters the branch will trap personal details, information on their requirements, plus the option of a photo, to assist with speedy ID on arrival.  An iPad at the front desk picks up the alert.  All of these touch points can then alert bank staff to react promptly, discretely and courteously when a customer with an assistance need arrives at the branch to improve the overall customer experience.

Previously, Barclays pioneered customer banking transfers using only a mobile number, plus enabling some businesses to swap PINs, passwords and authentication codes for fingerprint scanners.  Technological advances have not by themselves caused massive behavioural changes to get customers to switch or stay loyal, but a combination of technology and personal intervention with insight creates a whole new level of customer care.

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